Practice Safety

Hello,
My name is Jarvis. Yes, like the computer in Iron Man! I spent 22 years in the Army, so I have quite a bit of familiarity with weapons and weapon systems. I was deployed to Iraq during OIF and OEF, which means some of my experience with weapons is combat experience. No, I didn’t kill anyone, but I know about adrenaline and how it can cause you to shake and lose your focus on breathing and trigger squeeze. Been there and learned how to work through it. My wife says I have no reaction to anything anymore. A bomb could go off in the living room and I won’t even blink. I’m not saying you’ve got to become a stone cold, zero affect, trained sniper to survive an encounter, but you do need to prepare yourself for the adrenaline rush that accompanies such encounters. The only thing the can counter that is training. Practice drawing your conceal carry often and build muscle memory. Practice reload drills. Practice until you are confident that could do it blindfolded. (For the new people: always practice with an unloaded weapon until you get more experience. (Don’t do it blindfolded.)) Remaining calm and performing your practice drills will build a foundation of repeatable steps that your body will remember when your mind goes blank. Wear your weapon the same way every time you put it on. Don’t change your set-up from day to day. This simple habit will assist you in building that muscle memory.

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Good advice sir! BTW welcome :us:

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Welcome

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Welcome aboard brother warrior. We are glad to have you.

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@Jarvis5
Welcome to the family brother and thank you for your service.

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@Jarvis5 Welcome to the community, Thank you for your Service!

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Hello, welcome, and thank you for your service :us: @Jarvis5

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Great advice Jarvis, thank you for your service and welcome to the group.

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Welcome aboard!
Nothing beats info coming directly from the field!

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