Please Speak up (Caution, graphic picture)

Right. That’s what I was told. Headspace issue which can cause “stretching” of the shorter, thinner cased. 308, and that the .308 was slightly higher in pressure.

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The pressure loadouts I find for 308 are in psi. The pressures in 7.62 in c.u.p. the difference is negligible when you convert. I have reloaded both and cut my cases to the same lengths without any issues in thousands of rounds through the same rifle. So head spacing might be an issue in factory ammo but never had it with reloads.

Right, the pressure difference isn’t much to make that big a difference, it’s more the headspace of both factory rounds that contributes to potential issues.

I also know that modern 7.62x51 rifles are built to almost .308 specs. Springfield Armory says that you can use .308 hunting rounds in the M1A, all they reccomend is to not use soft points because they don’t like to chamber well. I am eventually going to take mine to Texas one day to hog hunt, and I’ll be running .308 ammo in it, or reload hunting rounds in the 7.62 brass.

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@Christopher1, you are absolutely right! God has really changed my life since that day!

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So here’s an article from the NRA on the 7.62 vs. .308 subject.

Didn’t bother me in the least.

EDIT

I guess I should be more clear. None of the images shown in this thread bother me. Truth is truth.

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@Dawn as for the pictures im good with em. They show ya what can happen . If ur gonna carry you may encounter something a whole worse than these. Better to see and beawre than to not wanna look .

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The picture didn’t personally bother me, but I’m sure some people could react negatively to it. I came in to the thread with full knowledge that there was some graphic picture in it due to the heading. If feel like that was definitely fair warning, but if a picture is too extreme, maybe a clear definition of the content before the picture can be seen would be appropriate. To me, seeing pictures like that provides some great mental training to realize how important being safe is and what the consequences of not being safe can be. I don’t feel like anyone is exempt from a momentary lapse in judgment by themselves or even someone else. Sorry you had to go through what you did, @Robbie13.

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You can shoot .308 or 7.62x51 From a gun chambered in .308, but only shoot 7.62 out of a rifle that’s chambered for 7.62. It’s a weird kind of thing. The brass is thicker on a 7.62, but the pressures are higher on a .308, a 5.56 and .223 are different because the 5.56 has thicker brass and is a bit hotter than the .223 which seems to make more sense to me. So then they made the .223 Wylde, I used one for a build not long ago, it’s pretty awesome, these barrels give you the best of both worlds, they’re designed to shoot both calibers and are very accurate. As a rule, (rules are made to be broken sometimes) the .223 was built more so for accuracy, and they are very accurate, the 5.56 is no slouch in the accuracy department, but as a military cartridge, it was designed to last longer. You can shoot out a .223 barrel a lot faster than a 5.56 barrel. Hope this information helps you a little bit.

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It takes A LOT of rounds to shoot out either though. Thankfully, because unlike any magnum cartridge, the .223/5.56 is fun to shoot. Lol. I don’t think I’ve ever seen an AR chambered in .223 rem either.

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The same thing goes for .357 Mags. You can shoot .38 spl or .38 +p in the .357 Mag. But you cannot shoot a .357 mag in a .38 spl or a .38 +p. And the main difference is the length of the .357 mag brass. it is longer than the .38 spl or .38 p+ brass. Plus the pressure is higher in the .357 mag as well. And you cannot shoot .38 +p in a .38 spl because the pressure is higher as well. I have a .357 mag revolver and a lever action rifle and I can and do shoot all 3 calibers in them with no problems. I also have my late father’s .38 spl that I can only shoot .38 spl ammo in because it won’t take the pressures of .38 +p and of course the .357 mag ammo won’t fit.

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I’ve created a new topic to discuss the different "Interchangeable" ammo that this topic is going off topic about.

Off topic is fine and dandy, the new topic is so it’s easier for everyone to find the information they’re interested in.

Carry on! :wink:

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I’ve seen .223 barrels get shot out after about 5000 rounds, it depends on the steel it was made out of. Cheap barrels, cheap steel, I won’t mention any name brands. Where I’ve seem 5.56 barrels last over 20,000+ rounds and still shoot a 6”-8” group at 100 yards. Rapid fire has a lot to do with this, that pipe heats up pretty fast and then gets scored, that’s the start of it, then break spots in the rifling. A lot of guys that do magdumps are the ones that will shoot them out more than the guy that shoots conservatively. Bump stocks and binary triggers are a good way to do it quick. Also a piston driven gun will usually last longer than a direct impingement gun. A good way to know that your barrel is done is if your keyholing your targets, instead of a round hole, it has an oblong hole with rough edges using factory ammunition, I say factory ammo because this can also happen if you reload your ammo and crimp the case too much. The bullet has a tendency to tumble.

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Yep, rapid firing could over heat your barrel and throw off the heat treat, a lot of people blame bad steel on their problems, when the issue is that their heat treat was messed up. I bet whomever you know that had a shotout barrel after 5k rounds probably messed up their heat treat at some point in time by firing too fast, cooling down the barrel with their water bottle, or something.

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I’ve never seen anyone pour water on their barrel to cool it down, most of the time they are always bumping one mag after another, I don’t condone this at all, I feel that you are not in control when bumping, binary triggers are another one I’ve seen, although they are fun, the same thought applies about being in control. I use the Tac-Con 3-MR system in a lot of my competition guns, I can still shoot very fast but I’m always in control. A well made barrel seems to last a long time, I like to use the JP Enterprise, Spikes, and Craddock barrels mostly, but there are so many good ones out there.

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I’ve seen people cool off barrels with water. It’s an interesting sight. Yeah, you’re never in control firing as fast as an automatic rifle fires. I think I’ll get plenty of life out of my PSA barrel. I’m planning on a better barrel for it eventually though.

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I built an AR10 and love to run 308 through it, but the 7.62 is so much cheaper. 1000 rounds here is about 28-33 cents a round. I have seen it a bit cheaper, but this is pretty consistent at my gun stores I go to.

Palmetto is a good barrel James, some people would disagree because they aren’t a fancy barrel and they are reasonably priced, most of their issues are cosmetic, not the quality in the machining. There’s a few guys out there that claim to have built a complete AR-15 for under $500.00 using Palmetto components, that’s pretty unbelievable, for a good running AR, my last build ran me about $3k, but that’s a straight up competition gun with the best of everything into it. About the same money for my AR-9 which I use for PCC division in IDPA and USPSA. We have a match today at 10:00am today and I’m pretty stoked, our first outdoor USPSA match for the season. Shoot straight and be well bud. :sunglasses:

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Yeah mine was $489 total. Free floated barrel, and a no frills lower. I’m slowly replacing components but itll be over 1k by the time I’m done.

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