New 2A group for Asian Americans

Asian Americans Create Gun Group as Ownership, Hate Crimes Rise › The Reload

The Asian American and Pacific Islander Gun Owners (AAPIGO) was recently formed in response to anti-Asian crimes. I don’t know how far they’ll go, but this type of reaction makes sense to me. If you feel like your group (whether religious, ethnic, racial, etc.) is being targeted, then it’s time to train on our right to self-defense.

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I’m Asian, but I don’t see the point of this group.

Maybe it’s just me, but how does creating a race based group help the issue? They say “non-partisan”, but doesn’t the name imply otherwise? It’s just another way to encourage segregation and “us against them” mentality.

In my experience, there are plenty of organizations, groups, clubs, etc. that are based on the interest in whatever it is you are joining for and are are pretty much blind to color, race, religion, etc. What better way to show that we are not that different than mixing it up?

Sure there are people who may not like someone else for whatever reason, but that happens everywhere. Even in an Asian-only group, there will be someone who doesn’t like (insert Asian nationality, Asian heritage, or Asian religion here).

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I partially agree. But if [insert demographic] feels threatened and they want to do something positive, a 2A group is a lot more effective (and safer) than protesting on the interstate.

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It’s a fair point, but why not join an existing 2A group?

If nothing else (yes I’m taking it to the extreme here) learn how your potential “enemy” thinks and see how they train.

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I agree with your statement about race-based groups. While I respect your background and culture I will address you as an American. We must stand united against the forces trying to make us bitter enemies.

If we are hurt we will all shed a tear, if we are cut we will all shed red blood. We are the same just different skins.

Larry

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How can I say this in love? I am not of Asian decent but I am one which have been and still is faced with hate crimes daily. I agree with some of the things you speak of but life has taught me that it’s ok to be among peoples of your own race and peoples of other races. This can hopefully help with the separation between the races, after all we are really the same if we all become blind to race. I myself enjoy being with and learning from peoples of all races.

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Well said Lu-Can, while my “Book” learning may have ended years ago, my people learning continues and will continue until I die.
I have leaned something from everyone I have met around the world.

Larry

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What we need are more Asians who identify as Americans as soon as they receive their green card or take their oath of citizenship :us:
I came from an Asian country and I don’t need that group.

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Just my opinion… I’m trying to summarize just one factor in a complicated, uncomfortable topic…

For some reason, when I clicked on the link when logged off, I think it went to a different website… I can’t find it now.

Anyway… not that it should matter, but I’m half Asian. The link that I originally clicked on says this is a three person group, started by a white guy married to an Asian woman, with a mixed race daughter. This is all fine… but…

I too have traveled to a few Asian countries, spoke with citizens there, Asian American citizens here, my own family, etc. IMO, as first, second, and sometimes third generation immigrants (this includes white people), many still honor and respect the culture of their family’s or ancestor’s homeland, as well as embracing being American. Herein lies the problem with an organization like the one he is trying to start.

For example, there is a rich history in many Asian countries, often against other Asian countries. I could go into China’s issues with the Japanese, Filipinos issues with the Japanese historically, or South Koreans more recently, Japanese issues with… other Asian countries, etc. Much of this sentiment and history is remembered with Asian Americans who remember these conflicts and have family or friend ties to the respective country. Some of this is also from pride in one’s ancestor’s country, or for the positive aspects of cultures from within those countries that are not often related to the stereotypes of that culture seen in the new country.

This isn’t an Asian thing. I have friends that lived in Riverside Plaza in Minneapolis. I lived there for a few weeks with one of those friends while waiting for my lease at another place to start. Try calling a Somolian American a Nigerian American, or vice versa. There were also issues between newly Black citizens and Black citizens who have been here for multiple generations.

I spent a lot of time with friends or families from Mexico, Venezuela, Argentina, etc. Some were/are first or second generation American citizens, some were here on Visa’s. You don’t want to confuse who is from which country, let me tell you.

One last example is with white people… although now it’s hard to tell what’s considered white and not white. If I call a Polish American “french”, or an English American “german”, etc. it’s not uncommon to see them get offended. Even calling an Australian person a New Zealander. I still have problems with that one. I do notice that someone who has many cultures in their family tree tend to disregard cultural ties to their respective ancestry.

I’m not trying to say that any of the above is good or bad. It’s just my personal thoughts and experience in the matter.

I might delete this post. Sometimes the beautiful and mysterious nuances in life are trampled on by those trying to maintain a racial narrative for all occurrences.

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We are almost there. Every man for himself. Divided we stand and divided we shall fall. It’s what are elected leaders are hoping for! Soon it will be new 2A group for red heads, then new 2A group for owners of three legged frogs. If history serves, it’s exactly how our little friend with the mustache achieved his goals! Divide and conquer! Game over! Fortunately the USA came to help, there is NO ONE coming to our rescue!

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Get on together or divide; we know the result both ways.

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This is a club to study guns and train in self-defence, these folks are not trying to secede from the county, take it easy you all. Maybe some have language difficulties, or newbies just feel more comfortable with folks that share their background, or club leadership hopes to attract more attention and $$ from their community this way. Why are there ladies shooting clubs? Why is there a JPFO? This is good diversity.

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I’m good with it, unless they discriminate against members/instructors. Since the founder is white, and married to some one of Asian descent we’ll see.
I could see being more comfortable with people that “look like me” if I was in the minority. Hopefully, this group will encourage its members to be active in the 2A community as a whole. The highest percentage of us 2A types, are color blind. As we see in this community, we come from all walks of life, religions/or lack of, and political affiliations.

All that said, if it is or turns into a “we hate x group” then I have no use for them.

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I can see the question from two points. One, is that there will be more “good guys” in the field who are trained and motivated. Two, since I hold no grudge against anyone who is a “good guy” their common bond may well motivate them. I use “guys” as gender neutral and hope that through their new found motivation they will support the same things I and we believe in!

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What races does the “Asian” designation include? Do Russians, Turks, Persians, Libyans, Syrians, Indians, etc., get included, or is it just Eastern Asians (from the “Oriental” countries)? Do those Eastern Russians, such as those from Siberia get included? It seems to me that the “PC” crowd that uses that term, uses it instead of “Oriental”, would that, too, then, not be racist/bigoted? I believe it is. It’s as if they can’t be bothered to figure out what race, country, whatever the person is from, so they just state “Asian”, which to me, is not only racist/bigoted (as if everyone from Asia is from China or some other “Oriental” country), but also plain ignorant of who and what countries compromise the Asian continent.

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Calm down, folks. They’re starting a gun club, not applying to your college. (Ivy League reference, there. Lots of folks want to be woke and “stand with Asian Americans” now, but last year the same folks wanted to cap the number of Asians who could attend colleges.)

I understand those of you saying “why do we need to start a new gun club, why can’t we all join the NRA”? To that, though, I have to ask “why does everyone have to join your gun club? Why can’t they start their own?” Heck, why are we in the USCCA instead of the NRA, if you all really believe that divided we fall?

Bottom line, someone is out there trying to bond together under 2A for self defense. They don’t need our permission to do so. I wish them luck.

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Both and more. I currently have zero confidence in the NRA (life member), but I belong to not only a state rights group, but a couple of other national rights groups - those with a proven track record.

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@Scotty I hope you do not delete your post, I found it inciteful and thought provoking. Thank you. :us:
And, no, I do not see a need for a 2A group for Asians. We are all Americans.
This is just another byproduct of “divide and conquer”.

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I don’t know if this group will achieve its stated goals but I am all for having a variety of diverse organizations working towards introducing as many people as possible to the benefits of protecting our 2A rights.

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If it will get more people from their community involved with pro 2A activities I don’t have a problem with it.
Can anyone regardless of ethnicity join?

http://jpfo.org/

As long as the groups don’t have adversarial relationships with each other.

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