Motorcycle riding with violent driver's

So I’m kind of new at this but i was talking to my boss about the adventures i have had riding my motorcycle i just started riding about 4-5 months ago now and I’ve been cut off passed in the same lane pushed into the next lane and almost into on coming traffic once but the question came up that if come across someone that is hell bent on doing harm to me or me and my girlfriend when riding would i be in the wrong if i pulled my firearm on said person i have not been in that situation yet and i really do not want to be but i have known few people that has happened too and i know what they did in the situation but i want to make sure i make the right decision and not one that will cost me.

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I would not pull my gun but what you can do is get the license plate number. You can always report it to the police and they can investigate. If a person does cut you off it’s unsafe operation of a motor vehicle. But if that person reports you first you are guilty of menacing/brandishing of a firearm.

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The first thing to do when encountering a dangerous situation is to get away from that situation. That can be hard to do on the road and depends on the route(s) available to you. However, drawing one’s weapon is always further down the list of responses.

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Florida drivers are notorious for being radical, that’s because they are all New Yorkers and think they own the road. They are truly a menace to society and represent a clear and present danger, both on the roads and their political views when they infect a state!
The radical part of me says (fill in the blank). But according to Florida statutes on “justifiable use of force” prohibits that act. My best advice is get dashcam for your bike or body cams. Even though it won’t matter, unless caught in the act! So, like most will say, avoid the area. Unless they kill you, you don’t have a case. That’s the new world, bad guy wins, good guy loses.

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I’ve been riding a motorcycle on public rods almost 40 years. Unfortunately, most of the issues you’ve experienced are not out of malice towards you, but mostly the other driver being unaware and potentially negligent. I don’t believe those would justify deadly force.

Situational awareness and defensive driving are very important on a motorcycle and you will gain more experience as you ride. Not only where you are on the road (are you on his/her blind side, do you have enough safety cushion between you and the other vehicles, do you have an “out” in case something happens), but also what other people are doing (are they using their phone, are their hands moving on the steering wheel or turning their head potentially indicating a turn or merge, are they centered in their lane).

On the extreme case of road rage towards you, the motorcycle is more maneuverable than a car and can let you into spaces that a car would not. Use that advantage to get away from the situation. Regardless of right or wrong, that should always be the first option.

Drawing your firearm will severely limit your ability to control your motorcycle.

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Remember a motorcycle is a small thing compared to car or truck? I have almost sideswiped a motorcycle that I never saw in my side mirror! Apparently the motorcycles are faster in power and I do have respect for all motorcycles! They do come out of no where really fast! Gosh, The guy did give me a long stare as he drove by my Jeep Wrangler! I didn’t flip a bird at him but with respect, mouthed “Sorry”! He went on! So you all have to double check what’s behind you or on the side mirrors! One big reason, I tell my friend sell your motorcycle! You are better off in a bigger vehicle!

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Thank you guys for the information i have had the same sight as you guy’s i was just curious because of a situation one of my friends got into which was similar with a violent driver against him and a few buddies.

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@Casey6 Your firearm isn’t the answer. I rode motorcycles for over forty years before hanging up my helmet. Commuting on a bike wasn’t that fun in the DC beltway. Too many angry and distracted people in the area. Had a few safety classes along the way. I was a SVIA Safety Instructor for over 10 years. Been down a few times. The best advice I can give you is spend all your effort in riding defensively. Cars and trucks have a significant weight advantage. Drivers aren’t paying attention. Stay focused because others aren’t. It has been since the advent of the smartphone that driving is no longer the primary focus. Keep the sticky side down, brother.

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My husband has been riding for a number of years now, with me often as rider. Thankfully, his certification course instructors also taught some defensive maneuvers with the basic course. I would consider finding somewhere that offers such a course in your area and taking it. In the meantime, purchase a body cam and/or helmet cam to wear. Then you would not only have the plate numbers of the vehicles, but you could show officers, lawyers, courts video evidence. But definitely avoid any situation where you would have to pull your firearm, if at all possible… and never from a moving motorcycle!! I am the gun owner, husband is the motorcycle operator. Here in Michigan, not only do we deal with the “blind and oblivious” drivers, but horrible potholes. too. Anytime we see a driver with their phone in their hands in the vehicle next to us, we do holler at them to put their phone down. Most times, seeing it coming from a rider, we see them quickly toss it on the passenger seat. Do they pick it up when we are out of site, probably, but for the time we are in view, we are that little bit safer.

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I have been riding since May of 1964 and I have never had that problem. I still have the token Harley and two Polaris Slingshots one with 102,000 miles and it’s replacement with 14,000 miles.

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I’ve been riding for just over a year and I still don’t take a passenger. Most drivers aren’t paying attention and don’t see a motorcycle because they’re not looking for them.

Please remember that the only reason to use your firearm is if you’re in imminent, unavoidable danger of death or grave bodily harm. On a bike, you can get away.

Not to mention, how do you draw, aim, shoot, and handle recoil on a bike at speed?

If you can avoid the situation, you’re definitely more likely to get home safely.

I always make sure I can see the driver’s eyes in one of their mirrors. Will they always see me? No, but at least I’ve given myself a better chance of being seen.

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Most drivers have their head inserted somewhere and don’t see anything. I think my car came with a Klingon Cloaking Device as people pull out in front of me all the time like they do not see me…

and then there are those who either ran out of ‘blinker fluid’ or failed to purchase the optional equipment of a turn signal and just stop in front of you.

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Casey, I’m 250k+ miles into motorcycling. Sadly, my advice is “get used to it”, wear GREAT protective gear, and ride defensively. Like with firearms, just stay away from most folks. The quality of drivers is steadily getting worse and on a bike you’re much more maneuverable, but you have to pay much more attention to remain unscathed. A rider is much more at risk.

The chance that you’ll need a firearm WHILE riding is just about zero. While stopped (after an incident, while hiking, etc.) is slightly higher, but still incredibly low. You don’t want to be the person who escalates or bring terror to the situation.

Motorcycling is a romantic thing for many, but the reality is much different than a big smile cruising down the open road. It isn’t for everyone. The onus is all on you to stay safe, from bad drivers and bad people in general.

Or you can do what i did years ago, enjoy most of my riding time on a race track and have minimal local and mountain riders. I’d never use a single track vehicle to commute in today’s environment.

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:rofl:

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That is darn CRAZY :crazy_face: :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:

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Didn’t do bad…
And he hit the car… got it stopped… and got his man.

But yes, Brazil is wild… our old wild west is tame by comparison.

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Gave up bikes back in the hmm, I guess it was 1990?

Had wrecked one, and realized traffic was simply too bad around Washington DC…

I still feel the wreck… in my shoulder and arm… but then, as we get older… .I feel lots of past years…

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Brazil… :scream:

He took 5 shots at the car with bystander running few yards away on the right…not mentioning the car parked behind… :smiling_imp:
A_20200929_04

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@Jerzy. Did he even know if there were kids in the car? :grimacing: That was some stupid shooting.

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This is Brazil ! Most shooting I’ve been watching from that country are crazy and irresponsible.

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