Modify my ownership

What is the deal about modifying anything I own??

I buy a car and can modify it to the way I want it: tires, mufflers and exhaust, stereo and speakers, repaint it and even make it go faster.

I buy a house I can remodel or add on to my like.

Why not my EDC to my like. Even if I choose to add a switch, or different stock or how long or short the barrel.

I have a child and get to choose how I raise them as I see fit.

I know that with each modification can be harmful or deadly or upgrade or even build from the ground up.

I own all these items. Each modification is my choosing.

Then why is ownership limited??

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Because it’s the law :man_shrugging:t4:

Just found out about this new infringement,
my fault for not being informed enough.

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Well, yes but also no.

If you are going to operate it on a public road there are actually a lot of restrictions. There are federal laws about messing with the catalytic converters for example. There are a lot of local jurisdictions with noise ordnance type restrictions effecting muffler choice as well. There are laws about how far you can lift a vehicle, minimum tread depth you can run, how dark the tint can be, there are laws in some states with a minimum bumper height so you can’t lower the car too far…there are rules for what lights…

…there are a lot of laws for your vehicle if it’s going to be on public roads (as almost all are) which is the comparison/analogy to a daily carry (in public) gun, eh?

There are also a number of codes/regulations about your house. You are supposed to get various permits for different things you do to or with your house.

There are also a number or laws on how you can raise your child. You can’t truly raise the child ‘as you see fit’, it has to be within certain guidelines or your state child protective services or whatever it’s called department will show up and if need be they can take the kids.

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That is 11% sales tax on top the regular sales tax. So if you live in a county with an 8.5% sales tax, you will be paying 19.5% sales tax for guns and ammo.

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@Nathan57

If the car or house is sold with those state approve modifications then it is legal to own and to operate or live in, even your child can be pre-approved on how you raise them and it will be ok by the state.

If this is really true they why are people still modifying. Even the factory or house builders are doing it according to the buyer not by the approval of the state.

Even children are getting modified and the state is doing nothing about it.

Then if the state does get involve with all of this, then it is called “Over reach of ownership”

Even my own body should not be or subject to the state…

If women can say my body my choice then all those modifications are justified. Cause I own them all.

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The thing is you can modify your gun as long as you don’t modify it into something illegal. Lawyers say one shouldn’t modify one’s gun because it makes it more difficult to defend you if you are in a gun fight.

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The great thing about living in my state of Arkansas I can do whatever I want to as long as I can prove my ownership with paperwork.

This is the only requirement.

If you live in a state that has government over reach your ownership then maybe you need to move…

Aside from the Constitutionally dubious laws against turning your firearm into a machine gun, turning a “rifle” into a “pistol” or adding certain evil parts, depending on the state you are in, there aren’t all that many restrictions against modifying firearms that I am aware of.

As @Nathan57 pointed out there are probably a lot more restrictions against modifying your car. Though even if you make legal modifications to your car, if those modification end up being linked to an accident then you could be held liable for additional damages due to your modifying actions creating an unsafe condition. This could certainly be the case with a firearm as well.

Then there is the issue of if the modification is worth the chance that it makes the firearm less reliable so that it has a greater chance of not functioning when you need it most.

But if modifications make your firearm more accurate and reliable then there is a strong argument that your modifications were to make yourself and others safer. Though a prosecutor or civil lawyer might try to paint that in a more negative light.

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As said above, depends on the status and defendability of the modifications. Grip changes are no different than adjusting the car seat to make it fit you. Night sights so you gun is pointing more accurately on target in low light. Cars have headlights, lights on your firearm allows more positive identification of the target and whether they present an immediate threat. On smaller guns a mag extension to get a better grip. I can also see trigger modifications for people whose strength isn’t what it used to be. Bottom line is to keep them legal for your area and if you’re concerned about how in a defense situation it will look you can show how these make you a safer and more more in control.

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I’m not poking you specifically, just a general principle I see in life. What one “can do” and what one should do are very often two different things.

As others have stated there are considerations of making illegal modifications (cutting a rifle barrel too short, for example) and then there are modifications that can (rightly or wrongly) be used against you.

Modifications I’ve made are limited to adding a light, sling, and Talon grips.

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