Lockpick for EDC: good or bad?

Look up your city or township statutes, the you can tell Google " statues for ??? County Alabama" sometimes if you go on the sheriffs web site, there will be a link to the statutes, you can get your information then ask more directed questions

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Love the awesome respect for LEOs and sharing of knowledge and suggestions here.

One other thing that gave me pause when someone mentioned it to me - the jury is supposed to be a jury of your peers. However, according to a study in 2017, three million people carry on a daily basis, that’s less than the population of LA. So the jury won’t necessarily be made up of your self-defense peers.

One more factor to make the jury question your intentions could be all it takes to sway their opinion.

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Ugh. I feel like we have to walk around on eggshells all the time when we consider gear and training.

We kind of do, Luke, but that makes our legal defense all the stronger if we ever do have to defend ourselves.

If you’re ever asked in court about why you carried what you carried, trained how you trained, or defended yourself - you’ll be able to site the extensive consideration and training you’ve done for your self-defense.

I sometimes equate it to why I read food labels - I know certain foods are bad for me, so I try to limit my exposure to it. And why I can’t, I know what I can do to protect my health (working out, balancing what I eat, vitamins, etc.).

Would you start a separate thread for baton suggestions? I think it will get more attention as it’s own topic instead of under the lockpick topic. Thanks! :slight_smile:

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I got confused at first. I realized that that was brought up in non-lethal EDC stuff after I posted that bit.
But sure. I can do that too.

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I worked as a locksmith for over 15 years and carried tools in my vehicle. I will tell you from experience, law enforcement did not look kindly on car opening tools until I produced my certified locksmith card. In some states you must be licensed to have lock picking/car opening tools and some you do not. Check with your local law enforcement, but when doing so ask them for the statute number(s) so you can read the whole thing yourself, not everyone is as good of an expert as you would like them to be (and I like to see it written when talking about laws).

@Andrew sounds like you were either in the trade or knew someone who was. The inexpensive end “Safes” for important papers can be opened in under 30 seconds if you know what you are doing.
Most criminals dont even worry about deadbolts as over 60% of them (I am being conservative here) are not properly installed when first put in.

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In my state, unless you’re a locksmith, it would be and is considered burglary tools. I’m a certified Locksmith, however, it’s not my profession, so I still don’t carry tools around with me, even though I can.

As a retired LEO I can assure you that you will be treated with EXTREME suspicion if a cop finds a lockpick set on you. Since they are considered burglary tools, it will give them “probable cause” to search your vehicle. And when police do a “probable cause” vehicle search, they don’t care about messing up the vehicle.

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I appreciate hearing from you since you’ve been out there and know how they’re apt to react. Thank you. I figured that carrying a lockpick wouldn’t be the best thing after reading what everyone had said before.

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here’s a link for the state status on legality of lockpicks:

or this:
http://lockwiki.com/index.php/Legal_issues

Lock picks, like slim Jim’s, are looked at a burglary tools in many area unless you have a job with a lock company.

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Steve Lehto. Michigan Lemon Law Attorney. Breaks it down pretty good.

They’re not illegal unless you’re caught “ridin’ dirty”.

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Unless you are a locksmith having one can be trouble. Some places possession of a set is considered burgled tools.

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A lock pick set in your possession will draw flies if you are caught with it even if you are allowed to have it. There are states, counties and cities that consider them “burglary tools” without a locksmith cert. and in most instances a DCJS certificate, locksmiths are VERY regulated (at least in VA).

One other tool will REALLY frost a LEO’s hide is a hand cuff key. They REALLY don’t like it when you hand them their Peerless Handcuff’s after they kept you alone in the back seat of a squad car for a couple hours. In my case it was a joint Mil, Fed and LEO training exercise and they thought they would stick it to the “skinny Navy” guy. It was my job to get caught. When they bounced my head off the door jamb it was on! Not only did I come out of the car un cuffed, I had the shotgun from the front seat (I unloaded it). Needless to say significant training value was added to the scenario in multiple areas as well as some red faces.

Cheers,

Craig6

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I just carry a business card :wink:

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I keep my truck keys on one ring and everything else on another. I keep a spare truck key on the second ring too. I’ll never be locked out of my truck.
My wife had locked herself out of the house a couple times. It was safer and easier to get on the house than into a locked vehicle in a busy area or dangerous area.
Of course on the other hand I forget I’m carrying a universal key on my side. Just joking!

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I like that!!! Can I A$$ U Me that the tension bar is in the middle waiting to be bent? I’d pay you for your business card if it is yours.

Cheers,

Craig6

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@Craig6

I have one and only one :slight_smile:
That business card is Kevin Mitniks and he is a very famous computer hacker and I work in IT and I got it at a security conference.

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