Let’s talk 1911s, whatcha got, whatcha want?

Thank you @Steve-G :blush: That’s 6 yards, in the late dusk, first magazine :grin:
Seems to shoot right where I think it will. :star_struck:
Now a bit of range time as we get to know each other… I’ll report back when my 16 yards looks like that.
And you’re right, she’s a beast. :smiling_face_with_three_hearts:

Officially going on record as Yes. Yes you do.
:grin:

Ha!

All things considered, the Israeli 1911 is probably too expensive for me. Dave Ramsey and Mr. Budget would gang up on me if I got it now.

Apparently there is also a 1911 manufactury that moved to Albuquerque. You can get a 1911 with a Zia hammer. If it’s not ludicrously expensive, I might get one of those. Change out the grips. Have an American flag on the right, and a New Mexican flag on the left. But then again, Dave Ramsey might get me.

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OK, I read what everyone has. Now, what is your dream 1911?

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For those wondering about how to take down a 1911 the easy way. (Forgive the dirty paws and claws, and my thumb nails are extra long on purpose because of the stuff I do for a living)

The squeeze

Pop the pin

Catch the spring

Slide it off

Simple as that. Getting the recoil spring, guide rod and such out is your particular pistol’s issue.

Cheers,

Craig6

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Now onto the cool stuff!!!

I bought a bone stock RIA “Rock Standard” and got it home and started playing with it. Didn’t like the ambi safety because of how it interfered with my grip. So I thought to myself… “Self, you are going to replace it so why don’t you play with it and see if you can make it fit?”

I don’t have a pic of the right side safety before I started carving on it so the left side will have to do as they were identical

First iteration, not happy can feel movement in my grip hand, you can see where I am going

Pretty much solid on this one

Mebby a little more

All of the above was done by hand filing, I will get around to polishing it up prior to color coat, or ceracoat or whatever I decide.

Next it’s to attend to the sharp edges on the beaver tail. Hell, then I may even go shoot it :crazy_face:

Cheers,

Craig6

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… Aaaaand… yeah, that’s the thing right there. :woman_facepalming: [sigh]

@zee,

You do have a 45 wrench correct? While single piece guide rods are more of a challenge they can be defeated. If you use the wrench by putting it on a table/bench and pushing the slide down on it things are a bit easier. I drilled two holes in my wrench so that I could bolt it to my bench for this purpose. Then I bought a two piece guide rode and now I don’t use it any more.

Cheers,

Craig6

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@Craig6 you are obviously really comfortable making modifications and disassembling your 1911s. I hope I can be that comfortable some day. And congrats on getting your new RIA! I love Rock Island Armory, and think pretty much anything they put out is a fine gun. And thanks for posting the pictures of the “muscling” way of disassembling the 1911. I studied the pics carefully.

As for what is my dream 1911, I’m thinking the Wilson Combat Ultralight Carry Professional or the Cabot Charley. I haven’t looked at all the Cabots, or even all the Wilson Combats, but one of those would really make my day.

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@Nancy The only way to get comfortable with taking them apart … wait for it … is to take them apart, ALL the way apart. When I started working on 1911’s there was no internet and the Brownell’s catalog was 50% 1911 parts. One of the first things I did was to get a book "The Colt .45 Automatic: A Shop Manual by Jerry Kuhnhausen. I read it cover to cover and kept it handy as I learned about the pistol and it formed the basis for my method of modification. He produced a 2nd book “Vol II” of the same name. Good addition to his previous work. I highly recommend both if you are serious about 1911’s and have any intention of trouble shooting issues or modifying one.

A thought for making the slide disassembly a bit easier is once you get the critter apart is to put a slight chamfer on the back side of the “ears” of the barrel bushing. It will make getting the bushing over the recoil spring plug easier. Remember turn the bushing CW to get the plug/spring out THEN CCW to get the bushing out.

Cheers,

Craig6

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@Craig6 I just ordered the books by Kuhnhausen on Amazon and am looking forward to learning a bit about my guns. Thanks for the tip. As for taking apart what I have, I just returned from the range and am about to take them apart again to clean them and lube them. I had trouble at the range with chambering rounds (I couldn’t pull the darn slide back!), so the rangemaster lubed them for me really well and I was finally able to do it. It was really embarrassing, though, to not be able to do it myself. Future trips to the range, I bring a bottle of lube with me!!! BTW, what is a chamfer? Do I need a special tool to put a chamfer on the back side of the ears of the barrel bushing? I guess I’ll be learning what basic tools I need once I start reading the books you recommended. Maybe I’ll even learn what a chamfer is!!! lol

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@Nancy

1911’s can be tough to rack if you are a little low on the hand strength side. One technique a young lady taught me: Point the pistol down straight in front of you but 90* left (A$$ U Me ing) your right handed) so your trigger finger is up (and off the trigger). Grasp the slide with the left hand. Rotate your upper body to the right about 45*. By keeping your arms straight the rotation will "shorten your left arm and increase the length of the right in relation to the gun, thereby racking the slide. Providing you can hang on to the slide. Be aware if you are square to the range you will come dangerously close to pointing sideways across the range. I suggest you talk a half step forward with your right foot, then step back when done.

That half step forward and half step back was the “unusual movement” that lead me to the young lady that taught me that trick, as such you may have to explain it to someone on the range if it works for you and you use it.

Chamfer is “cutting an angle into a otherwise straight surface to break the edge”. You will hear it commonly when talking about reloading rifle ammo where they “Chamfer” the mouth of the case to allow easier seating of the boolet.

In this case as you noted the back side of the ears where the plug seats. The tool needed is a flat file,preferably fine toothed. MANDATORY: one side of the file must have a non-cutting/smooth edge. This way you can just knock the ears down a little bit to get things moving without changing the diameter of your bushing.

If your bushing is REALLY tight in the slide now might be a good time to grab a green scrubby pad and polish the outside bearing surface of the back of the bushing. A simple twisting motion in opposite directions with both hands will smooth it right out.

I’ve been accused of being verbose. It is however incredibly difficult to draw a picture with words so I do the best I can to explain it fully.

Cheers,

Craig6

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Now on my shopping list:

@Nancy - Chamfer
chamfer
Machining or woodworking term for describing a particular edge shape when forming parts :grin:

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@Zee Thanks for the pictures.
@Nancy The picture is a 45* chamfer. That is NOT what I’m talking about but the pic helps. Decease that angle to like 10* mebby 7*. You want no more than the thickness of a standard un coated paper clip of clearance at the far ends of the ears, like 1/32". Just enough yo break the sharp 90* edge of the bushing ears to get things moving.

Cheers,

Craig6

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Here is the bestie that started it all for me. Purchased on my 21st birthday. 30 days later I took a hacksaw to her to begin fitting the Ed Brown beaver tail. The holster and the finished product are roughly the same age.

The black bits have all been re coated / blued at least 3 times. I gave up on the vanity of it about 15 years ago and let the “grey” shine through :laughing:

Cheers,

Craig6

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More embarrassing, in the long run, to go home without being able to shoot your firearm because you didn’t ask :wink:

Racking that slide can be a commitment - here’s the technique I use with a very hard-to-rack firearm (I’m right handed). Forgive me if I’m telling you stuff you already know. I’m using @Craig6’s lots-of-words plan since I don’t have video.

  1. Hold the firearm in my right, finger off the trigger, pointed downrange, with my elbow bent and my right elbow roughly at my right side. (this is the same arm position I use when typing this… elbow at my side, forearm extended forward.)

  2. Left hand at my center chest with the arm held high… left elbow high, not down at my side. (think: Roman chest-thumping salute)

  3. Turn my left side downrange so I’m facing the shooter to my right while keeping my firearm pointed downrange. This will put my right hand and the firearm more or less in front of my solar plexus (this is why you want the left arm/elbow up, so you don’t muzzle your left elbow.)

  4. Ok now you’re in position. Make sure you’re still pointing the muzzle down range and your left arm is clear above the muzzle.

  5. Grip the slide with the left hand so your thumb is on the near side and the fingers are on the far side of the slide. Get as much skin on the sides of the slide as you can, but not the top of the slide (because the rear sights will bite you across your palm as you rack and release if you are on the top of the slide).

  6. Rack by DRIVING your right hand with the gun towards the target, and DRIVING your left hand towards your right elbow. You’re using your pectoral muscles and biceps in opposition to each other, and that should be maximum muscle leverage. Basically you are trying to drive the gun frame through the slide while driving the slide through the gun frame. The frame will then take the slide through your left hand as it reaches the end of the rack. Do make sure your left hand isn’t contacting the top of the slide because when it escapes your left hand, you don’t want the rear sights dragging across the left palm as they go by (that hurts).

  7. I usually end with my left hand roughly over my right elbow and my right hand and gun under my left elbow.

  8. Step back into normal shooting position, muzzle remaining downrange, left arm staying up and clear of the muzzle.

Anyway, that’s what I do. And if the slide is really stiff, I rack it like I’m mad at it. :rage:

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Ladies. While the act of cycling a round into the camber is a significant event on the RANGE the more likely event should you need to utilize your firearm in the event of a real shooting is that you will hit the safety and the trigger at the same time which WILL cause you to shoot low and left of the target. Train to have the safety depressed prior to the pounds of pressure required to loose the hammer. There are multiple methods to accomplish this, my trained and preferred method is to bring the gun center, attain a solid two hand grip, safety off and push the gun to the center of the target hitting my detonation point at or near full extension. It is a skill set that can be taught and honed upon. It is a train slowly and develop muscle memory scenario.

Rake (your garment), Stance (MOVE), Grip, Brake (the thumb brake) Lift, Rotate, Point, Center, Safety (OFF), Push, Bang!

I promise you that if you need to rack the slide when you’re A$$Hole is wrapped around your neck you will not even notice that you did it providing you don’t go into vapor lock because you trained poorly and don’t know what to do next.

Cheers,

Craig6

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@craig6 sometimes we need to work the baby steps :wink: that’s what all the racking breakdown steps at the range are for. But I do it there so I build the muscles and muscle memory I might need later.

FWIW I wouldn’t carry a gun I can’t effective rack. In front, up, down, one handed on my belt or holster, weak or strong hand. And as far as safeties… mostly I carry Glocks so I AM the safety :wink:

I’ve never had to deal with a gun-drawing emergency (and I hope I never have to). But I’ve dealt with other kinds and have had both the time distortion everything-slow time to think things through and make every action under total control experience and the its allover in a flash and I’ll have to see it on the video to know what happened experience.

In both cases that train train train thing matters. :+1:

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:heart_eyes::star_struck::heart_eyes::star_struck::heart_eyes::star_struck::heart_eyes::star_struck::heart_eyes::star_struck:

1911all

Does it whatcha want? :+1:
(just got this pic on my email)

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@Jerzy … just goin’ with ooooOOOOOooooo!

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