'Key Bridge is gone': Ship strike destroys bridge, state of emergency declared

LOOK OUT! Everything happens in Three’s people!

Golden Gate Bridge toppled by Chinese Weather Balloon! Film @ 11:00!

6 Likes

I will take “things that wouldn’t make any news anywhere, and we would never know about, if it wasn’t for the incident in Baltimore” for $5000 (hey, inflation), Alex

Nothingburger

3 Likes
5 Likes

And this is interesting:

3 Likes

Whoopsie! I never had a Rowboat or Canoe get away from one of my Square Knots at camp when I was a kid !
Isn’t this the Third Boating Accident! These 'Barges" , The good ship lollipop in Baltimore and the
Verrazano-Narrows Bridge (NYC!)? … Ruh Roe! Don’t book that Carnival Cruise Lines package anytime soon! )If you do get the one w/ the Open Bar pkg. included) you may need the brain numbing as she sinks to the bottom! or a Deck Chair Arranging class at the YMCA! or hey better yet Swimming Lessons!

TOO MUCH? :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

5 Likes

More on Maritime Law. :thinking:


The Associated Press - Business News

Owner of ship in Baltimore bridge collapse asks cargo owners to help cover salvage costs

Story by AP

Maryland Bridge Collapse

Maryland Bridge Collapse© Julia Nikhinson

BALTIMORE (AP) — The owner of the massive container ship Dali, which caused the deadly collapse of Baltimore’s Francis Scott Key Bridge last month, has initiated a process requiring owners of the cargo on board to cover some of the salvage costs.

The ship’s owner, Singapore-based Grace Ocean Private Ltd., made what’s known in maritime law as a “general average” declaration, which allows a third-party adjuster to determine what each stakeholder should contribute, according to company spokesperson Darrell Wilson.

The requirement is often invoked after maritime accidents so that the cost of saving a vessel or its cargo is shared among interested parties, Wilson said. In this case, it pertains to costs associated with refloating the Dali, which remains stuck with sections of the fallen bridge draped across its damaged bow.

Crews are working to remove some shipping containers from the Dali before lifting pieces of the wreckage and freeing the ship. They’re also working to clear debris from the Port of Baltimore’s main channel, which has been largely blocked for weeks, halting most commercial traffic through the major shipping hub.

A routine practice dating back centuries, the general average declaration marks the ship owner’s latest effort to minimize its financial responsibility in what could become one of the most expensive maritime disasters in history.

Fullscreen button

Maryland Bridge Collapse

Maryland Bridge Collapse© Julia Nikhinson

Grace Ocean and the ship’s management company, Synergy Marine Group, filed a petition soon after the collapse seeking to limit their legal liability — another routine procedure for cases litigated under U.S. maritime law.

Six members of a roadwork crew plunged to their deaths in the collapse. Attorneys for some of their families and a survivor pledged to challenge that petition and hold the companies accountable.

One of the cargo owners, Mediterranean Shipping Company, announced last week that it was informed of the general average declaration by the Danish shipping giant Maersk, which chartered the Dali. The declaration indicates the ship’s owner anticipates “extraordinary costs for which they expect contribution from all salvaged parties,” the company’s release said.

Officials have said the Dali and its cargo — about 4,000 shipping containers — will return to the Port of Baltimore once the ship is refloated.

The Dali departed Baltimore’s port early on March 26 laden with cargo destined for Sri Lanka. It lost power before reaching open water and struck one of the supports for Francis Scott Key Bridge, causing the span to collapse into the Patapsco River. Police rushed to stop bridge traffic after a last-minute mayday call from the ship’s pilot, but couldn’t save the roadwork crew. Two of the victims are still unaccounted for.

Fullscreen button

APTOPIX Maryland Bridge Collapse

APTOPIX Maryland Bridge Collapse© Julia Nikhinson

Both the FBI and the National Transportation Safety Board are conducting investigations into what led to the disaster.

3 Likes

I think your numbers are a bit low. :grimacing:

At Least 424 Cargo Ships Lost Power In U.S. Waters Over The Last 3 Years (msn.com)

The bow of the container ship Dali is seen in the wreckage of Francis Scott Key Bridge, on April 2, 2024, a week after it hit a structural pier causing a catastrophic bridge collapse.

The bow of the container ship Dali is seen in the wreckage of Francis Scott Key Bridge, on April 2, 2024, a week after it hit a structural pier causing a catastrophic bridge collapse.© Photo: Jerry Jackson/The Baltimore Sun/Tribune News Service (Getty Images)

The bow of the container ship Dali is seen in the wreckage of Francis Scott Key Bridge, on April 2, 2024, a week after it hit a structural pier causing a catastrophic bridge collapse.

After the MV Dali brought down the Franklin Key Bridge in Baltimore, folks wondered how this could happen, and could it happen again? As if to answer this unspoken question, it almost immediately happened again: the APL Qingdao lost power near the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge in New York Harbor earlier this month.

The really bad news is, Americans have been lucky so far.

Ships are complex machines the size of buildings, so it’s a little surprising to hear the process for handling them around American waters is rather loosey goosey. The Washington Postfound that at least 424 cargo ships over 600 feet in length lost power in U.S. waters in the last three years. Ships keep getting bigger, but the ports they operate in stay the same size — a disaster in the making, according to the Post:

Adding to the danger, experts say, is a lack of consistent rules on when cargo ships should be escorted by tug boats that can keep them on course even if engines turn off. While tugboats escorted the Qingdao, as was called for under local guidelines in the New York area, those attending to the Dali departed before it struck the bridge in Baltimore, where such decisions are left to ship captains and local pilots, the specially trained sailors who guide ships in and out of ports.

Container ships like the Dali and the Qingdao have doubled in size over the past two decades, experts said, while some American ports — built up over centuries around busy and cramped waterways — have struggled to adapt.

“I don’t think we’ve understood fully the consequences of these ships, of these large ships, operating in these ports,” said Aaron Davenport, a retired senior Coast Guard officer and expert in maritime safety.

Causes for the power loss ranged from derelict equipment to human error. Well, we in the U.S. had a pretty clear illustration of the consequence of giant cargo ships losing power in March. Currently, estimates for clearing enough wreckage to re open the Port of Baltimore is in the weeks, let alone rebuilding the Key Bridge. It seems like we might need an even bigger disaster before anything changes.

Joseph Ahlstrom, a professor at the State University of New York’s Maritime College, said in an interview that the frequency of propulsion loss points to a risk that must be better managed. Ahlstrom said he hopes the use of tugboats — which routinely help ships dock and undock but can also guide vessels that have lost propulsion to safety — would become more widespread after the Baltimore disaster.

“Most regulations are written in blood,” Ahlstrom said. “It takes something like this for people to say, ‘Whoa, we should do something.’”

You’d think we’d have learned something from the Ever Given, the giant cargo ship which blocked global shipping for almost a week back in 2021. But like many of the lessons of 2021, nothing changed and cargo ship are as big — and potentially dangerous — as ever.

2 Likes

Picky, Picky, Picky!
I am talking about things happening in (3’s!) Sir. (recent events!)
Not since man created the boat and sailed
or Created the Plane and flew!
or oh, neva mind! :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

4 Likes

Slowly put down the huffing bag of dog poo… :woozy_face: We can find you help. :dizzy_face:

4 Likes

Oh…OK, It’s gonna be that way with you for a little bit Huh?
Be werry werry careful My good sir…you poka da bear NO pic-a-nic
basket for you… NO WAFFLE’S FOR YOU!

5 Likes

Wanna bet the official findings were ready before the investigation started? That is the purpose of this kind of investigation.

5 Likes
6 Likes

Rough stretch of time to be a bridge.

8 Likes

What’s the status of the area being without the bridge? Haven’t heard that much about it. :us:

1 Like

Are you talking about Baltimore? If so, there is lots of local news talking about it. The channel will be opened soon. They used explosives to demolish the section of the bridge that landed on the ship.

3 Likes

Yep. Must not be watching the right channel

2 Likes

This is where I get Baltimore/central MD news. Here’s their lead article right now. Happens to be about the ship.

1 Like

The Unified Command said on Monday, they will open a 400-foot-wide, 50-foot-deep limited-access channel.

“By taking it out to 400 and the Dali being refloated, we’re going to be able to bring anything through the Port of Baltimore, anything that would have come through before,” Pinchasin said.

“…We plan to open a 400-foot by 50-foot channel (Monday), and hopefully, in the next week or so, we’ll be at that 700-foot channel, which is our goal.”

4 Likes

IMHO, I’d still send the owners of the ship and the company that operated it the bill for the replacement cost of the bridge under the rule “You break it, you bought it.”

3 Likes

But with a dedicated local harbor pilot actually piloting the ship, was it really the company operating the ship that broke it? Did they not hand off control of the ship?

1 Like