'Key Bridge is gone': Ship strike destroys bridge, state of emergency declared

My immediate thought, especially after the attack in Russia. There will be a lot of tap dancing around but my paranoia still tells me there is more to this than is readily apparent and that will be revealed. For instance, why is a ship this size transiting a reasonably narrow channel without tug assistance? Company too cheap to pay for tugs? Well, this little collision will cost them and their insurers way more than the cost of tug rental.

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All true sir. I was specifically thinking of her being gang raped during the so-called arab spring in Cairo. Horrific attack from a gang of savages. Poor thing. Just awful. Indeed yes on your point. She has seen a great deal of no kidding warfare.

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Welcome Aboard…bad choice of words :question:

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An interesting read on Maritime Law. :thinking:

Ocean Carrier Giants Invoke ‘Force Majeure’ Following Baltimore Bridge Collapse (msn.com)

In the wake of the deadly Francis Scott Key bridge collapse in Baltimore, container shipping giants are wasting no time in forcing shippers to foot the bill for products that will no longer be dropped off at the Maryland city’s port.

Mediterranean Shipping Company (MSC), Maersk, CMA CGM, Hapag-Lloyd and Cosco Shipping are among the ocean carriers that have declared “force majeure,” a clause that frees the liners from fulfilling contract obligations due to events entirely out of their control.

In this case, once the diverted cargo is dropped off at an alternative port, the carrier no longer has to assist with the movement of goods, leaving them off the hook for storage and transportation costs. This means importers become fully responsible for finding transportation to move the cargo to its final destination before container late fees are charged.

While the Federal Maritime Commission (FMC) enacted select rule changes in the post-Covid era in responses to accusations from shippers that ocean carriers were excessively charging demurrage and detention fees-resulting in a series of fines imposed on the ocean carriers- force majeure-related fees are unlikely to get the same treatment from the agency.

According to Andrew Lazaroff, senior vice president of sales at New Jersey-based freight forwarder Worldwide Logistics Group, the force majeure provision traditionally isn’t something that carriers are willing to waive in times of crisis.

“In cases like this, I don’t know how far shippers will get, because what, realistically, is a carrier holding container supposed to do? That’s why force majeure exists,” Lazaroff told Sourcing Journal. “They have to hold themselves somewhat harmless when they can’t go where they were supposed to go. This is just this is just why people should have a lot of diversity in their supply chain.”

On a positive note, Lazaroff said that some steamship lines are waiving change of destination (COD) fees, which will give shippers breathing room if they are diverting cargo from the Port of Baltimore to other ports.

Since the Tuesday morning incident, Worldwide Logistics Group has sought to mitigate any added costs for importers, helping them divert impacted freight along the East Coast while leveraging its two transloading facilities in New Jersey and Savannah, Ga. But according to Lazaroff, even freight forwarders haven’t seen enough information from customers yet to determine the timeline of how long the diversions will last, and the total range of impact on trade.

“Anybody importing into the U.S. right now will in some way be affected, specifically the East Coast, but probably even the West Coast,” said Lazaroff. “There’ll be some knock on effect. Hopefully it’s a short lived situation. Hopefully they open the channel and vessels can get back into Baltimore, and we’re not sitting here for weeks and weeks, but you’re probably going to see delays at East Coast ports as this cargo disperses.”

While the apparel industry doesn’t appear to be incurring any imminent impact from the incident and the ensuing blockage of the Port of Baltimore, furniture companies are expected to deal with delays and added costs resulting from containers being diverted to another port.

Ikea may be one of the major players impacted by the force majeure declaration. The Swedish home furnishings retailer had unloaded approximately 74 containers of products and furniture from the Maersk-chartered Dali container vessel on March 24, two days before the incident, according to ImportGenius.

Sourcing Journal reached out to Ikea.

Companies that are now needing to pay up extra for the transportation services will likely will be diverting container shipments to local hubs such as the Port of New York & New Jersey, the Port of Virginia and the Port of Philadelphia. While there are concerns of some of these East Coast ports being overcongested, both the N.Y./N.J. and Virginia ports have pledged their support to house the extra cargo.

On Thursday, the New York Governor Kathy Hochul and New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy issued a joint statement saying “The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey can take on additional cargo, and we have directed the Authority to further evaluate all available resources to minimize supply chain disruptions.”

And the Port of Virginia said Tuesday it began working with the ocean carriers so they can discharge containers at the port.

“The Port of Virginia has a significant amount of experience in handling surges of import and export cargo and is ready to provide whatever assistance we can to the team at the Port of Baltimore,” according to the gateway.

According to Asees Bajaj, an associate in the strategic intelligence practice of S-RM, a global corporate intelligence and cybersecurity consultancy, these ports offer greater capacity than the Port of Baltimore, and as such can absorb Baltimore’s incoming and outgoing vessel traffic.

“In this instance, port authorities are not having to contend with a build-up of shipping vessels on either side of the bridge,” Bajaj said. “Only seven other container ships had been scheduled to arrive at the Port of Baltimore through March 30, nothing close to the March 2021 Suez Canal block caused by the Ever Given container ship, where a queue of 369 ships built up on either side of the canal.”

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Don’t I know it brother. That place might as well be turned to glass, in certain places of course. I just recently had my fifth back surgery from my last mobilization in 2011. War is pretty tough on older guys. Lol

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You speakum gospel Brother,
That place left a nasty impression on my soul
Ms. Logan wasn’t the first/last to ‘experience’ these animals
hatred towards the kinder sex…phuckin’ animals.
I was detailing a truck yesterday and a huge ‘dust devil’ blew through.
I covered up, it was like old times and let it roll over me.
Flashback city… weird what can snap ya back there! (shuddering)

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How long does it take for such a large and heavy ship to stop once they “press stop”?

A U.S. Coast Guard search and rescue helicopter flies over the Dali cargo vessel, which crashed into the Francis Scott Key Bridge causing it to collapse in Baltimore, Maryland, U.S., March 26, 2024. REUTERS/Julia Nikhinson

Francis Scott Key Bridge, Baltimore, Maryland, U.S., March 26, 2024.

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Well Folk’s here’s something to think about…

Make’s ya go hmmmmmmmmmm 'ey what?

Thanks Friend, or is it Fiend? muahahahahahaha

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accident or attack? what? i saw the video- . it shows the ship headed straight for the support with no correction at all , with plenty of open space to safely pass next to it that was the Baltimore bridge . then a few days later Sat 3/30 a barge collided with a bridge in Oklahoma causing police to close a hiway there . it didn’t collapse just ruled unsafe now.coincidence? or ?

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Leroy, I believe everything has to be viewed w/ a ‘Clear Eye’
People that are NOT asleep must see if not Evil Intentions
should see these ‘EVENTS’ as suspicious.
The Media doesn’t help by lying and covering up for these CRIMINALS.
While all is not Chaos some are truly ‘Happy little Accidents’ Shite Indeed does happen.
Mother Nature, Earthly shake off’s, Some storms happen
But it’s Easter Sunday and I’ve put away the Tin Foil Hat list of man made atrocities!

Be Safe
Check sixx

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Accident, but it sure shared a great way to have an attack that can’t be stopped…and which will take years to recover from. Go news.

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Probably something that wouldn’t be reported on and you’d never know about if not for the accident in Baltimore, so now it makes the news.

I mean…we’re talking about a highway that was closed for a few hours. Can you imagine if it made national news every time an accident caused a highway to close for a few hours? Not even a few hours, the news story I read said 1:25 PM accident with no injuries and highway safely reopened after engineer inspection at 4PM. Is this supposed to be a big deal?

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I suspect smallish barges hit biggish bridges fairly often. Seems like whenever there is a flood on the Mississippi or other big river the news usually shows footage of a barge glancing off of or getting stuck at a bridge. Without the focus on a major flood or a recent major bridge collapse these minor collisions won’t make it past the local news.

This cargo ship was massive. Even when they don’t loose power and steering due to a malfunction it takes a very long time to get them to change direction.

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:man_shrugging:

River Cruise Ship Loses Power, Crashes Into Wall on the Danube Sending 11 Passengers to the Hospital (msn.com)

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Is anyone keeping score, Vegas odds?

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I think this does happen all the time, it’s just that the ship that hit the Key Bridge was huge, and it looks like the Key Bridge supports weren’t designed for any kind of significant lateral load.

I remember years ago when I lived in Buffalo, a barge went out of control and hit the Peace Bridge over the Niagara River. It remained stuck there for months (maybe years, I can’tremember), with the current wrapping it tighter and tighter around the bridge support it was stuck on.

Eventually the Corps of Engineers decided to get it off. They sunk two huge anchors down in the Lake Erie lake bed, well back from the river, and reeled out a crane barge on two 8" cables. As they were hoisting the wrecked barge off the bridge, one of the 8" cables snapped. That’s some very impressive current.

The point is, the Peace Bridge is sitting on huge piers designed to take a 10-20 MPH current with ice collisions, and the barge wasn’t a 900’ fully loaded container ship, so the bridge was the unmovable force, not the vessel.

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“The Casualty was not due to any fault, neglect, or want of care on the part of Petitioners, the Vessel, or any persons or entities for whose acts Petitioners may be responsible,” the filing states.

I just hate when those bridges just jump out infront of me like a dolphin in headlights. :roll_eyes:

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a dolphin in headlights! :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:oh jeez, you kill me man! :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: dolphin in…wphew! :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: rapier wit OH DEER! !

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Article linked in link includes this

The filings argue that the accident did not stem from any actions or neglect from the owner, the vessel or onboard crew members. The records state that the value of the ship at the time of the incident did not exceed $90m. Estimated repair costs are $28m, while salvage costs are $19m.

The companies are offering an interim stipulation of $43m, even though the total costs of the destruction have not yet been determined. Mr Davies said that any claimants, presumed to be relatives of the six men who died in the collapse, and the state can challenge the amount at a later date.

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Oops.

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