Illegals are ALREADY allowed to vote in the next election

Congress has seen to it.

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I want to take it one step further. I don’t agree with anyone voting in local elections that are not permanent residents, ie. I don’t agree that non-resident college students or non-permanent people should be able vote in local elections. If you’re not a part of the permanent community you should have no say in where the property or sales taxes of the community are spent. And obviously that is usually done through our elected officials. JMO

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“United States Citizen”, is a pronoun now!!!

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I understand your assessment of legal local voters; I’ve heard it several times before. I’ve also heard similar complaints from locals about non-property owners who can vote on issues and levies that directly effect property tax rates.

Out-of-state college students can in most cases vote locally in elections they may know little-to-nothing about or they don’t really care about - and they may have no “skin-in-the-game”. In many cases, all that is needed for voter registration is proof of age, “proof” of residence and U.S. citizenship. (Some states have removed the citizenship requirement for local elections.) Some states have requirements of registration x number of days prior to an election, while some allow same day registration.

I wonder how many college students might also return to their home towns to cast a vote or mail-in an absentee vote, effectively voting twice. While voting only once in each local contest, there may be national contests on those same ballots. Even if it is not a presidential election in which they could cast 2 votes for POTUS, students might be able to effectively vote for 2 U.S. Senators and/or members of the House in the same election cycle.

This theoretical loop-hole is not limited to college students; anyone who changes their address between election cycles may fall into this voting crack. Surely this is not legal, but who is even checking? The mess that is most states’ outdated registered voter lists makes it next to impossible to investigate effectively, especially if you consider possible variations on names, e.g., William vs. Bill, James vs. Jim, Johnson vs. Johnston, Jr. vs. Sr., etc. It seems that a single vote per person may depend entirely on the knowledge and the integrity of the voter.

So now, as devil’s advocate, I ask, “How should we determine ‘permanent residence’?”, I don’t have an answer. There are many persons, some home owners, some with families, who move every couple years or so.

In many states, simply having a public utility provided at an address in that state and billed in your name, qualifies as permanent residence. A 6-month or longer lease or rental agreement is another qualifier in most cases. In many states an 18+ years old citizen is automatically registered to vote when issued a driver license. In many states, the list of registered voters is never or rarely purged.

Somewhat ironically, home ownership alone does not constitute permanent or primary residence since any person may own more than 1 home.

While our concerns may be legitimate, I don’t see a way to make an effective change. But then I’m much too honest to be a politician so I am not and will not be a lawmaker.

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How can you “reasonably believe you are a citizen” by illegally entering the country? I know it won’t matter as liberal judges would just take their word for it. But would any REASONABLE person actully, truly, believe such blatant lies?

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I understand your point. Something interesting happened awhile back to a neighbor’s brother. His brother lives in CA and he talked him into getting a place up here. They love to fish and the local game warden came by checking licenses. His was a resident license. Somewhere in the conversation the warden got suspicious and ended up citing him for poaching. In court his primary residency was established by where and over what time purchases we made on his credit cards, as well as car registrations and driver’s license. He was convicted on the poaching charge. When I moved up here I had to wait 6 mos. To get a resident fishing license. To your point it all depends on how bad they want to enforce something and how far they’re willing to go to enforce it. We’re all familiar with the paperwork to buy a gun. I think something along this line should be required to vote .

I don’t have a good answer either. However, for in state tuition at universities/colleges, you were always required to have been a resident of the state for at least six months. While such a short period may not be appropriate for voting, a similar methodology could be employed to help prevent voting in multiple jurisdictions. The kicker here is that any such a system requires tracking of individuals. Something we fon’t like very much…

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I get it. However, I’m being tracked by so many entities: IRS, Social Security, owning property and property taxes, every time I use credit, by my driver’s license, CCW requirements, insurance, Medicare, cell phone…whew, best just stop there. You get my drift.

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Agreed. But if someone were to suggest tracking us to prevent voter fraud, all h.e.double hockey sticks, would ensue. Primsarily from the “d” side.

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I don’t know, Robert… Sounds good on the surface, but I have to tell you, if I had to complete anything like a 4473 and wait for a NICS every time I vote, I just might find myself skipping a few trips to the polls here and there. The lines would be atrocious.

Perhaps something similar but required only for voter registration, and then maybe repeated (renewed) every so many years. But for this to actually work, it would require an official registered voter ID card be issued and this card would have to be the only acceptable ID at the polls.

This would make mail in voting a little more difficult since I guess a photocopy of the ID card would have to be submitted with the mailed ballot. But then mail-in voting might be more secure this way, since the voter’s signature could be checked against the photocopy very quickly.

The left would go absolutely nuts trying to stop such a plan, which is one heck of a bonus. Taxpayer funded court costs wouldn’t be pretty though.

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  1. proof of U.S. Citizenship.
  2. proof of permanent residence of State and municipality your butt is parked in.
  3. no record of residence in prison for a felony.
    These things are not hard, they’re just ignored so felons, illegal alien trash, the dead, and the non-existent, can vote for the commie pig democrats. I know that may offend some people. I also know the Constitution enumerates no right, not to be offended.
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