How I Became the ‘Black Man With a Gun’ | USCCA

In 1992, my life changed when I testified to the Virginia House of Delegates on changing the concealed carry laws in the state. Local police chiefs controlled who could or could not get a concealed carry permit. If the authorities did not like the way you looked — or, more specifically, if you were a person of color — you could be denied a weapon.


This is a companion discussion topic for the original entry at https://www.usconcealedcarry.com/blog/how-i-became-the-black-man-with-a-gun/
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I totally agree with Reverend Blanchard. However, we MUST tackle the problem of illegal guns in the hands of gang members and other criminals. Young Black/Brown men killing other young Black/Brown men has become a cancer on our society that needs to be treated ASAP! I am also a concealed carry member. I would, however, like to see a day when the need for conceal carry was minimized.

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Had to share this one with friends. As a church elder, part of my role is to defend the church - from spiritual and physical attacks. Although my priority still has to be my family, logic dictates that de-escalating or stopping a threat as quickly as possible will not only protect my family but everyone else in the church building. Another elder will be getting his Concealed Carry License within the next couple weeks, and the other elders and some members have expressed relief that someone at least has a chance to stop a worse case scenario - since we don’t have police officers as members in our small church. I was encouraged to hear Reverend Blanchard’s testimony and that he also as that protective mentality and desire that I do.

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Thank you very much Reverend Blanchard!! I appreciate everything you have done to show support for gun law reform! I have my concealed carry permit for 2 states and I hope to never have to choose to use any of my guns in any situation, BUT I have the right to do so to protect myself and others. Be safe and always be prepared!! Mitch M.

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