Does your firearm have a manual safety?

It definitely has happened, I’ve seen some on video as well as someone trying to reholster in a hurry and not removing their finger from the trigger well.

1 Like

I’ve done the same myself.

I figure when I die my wife can sell off one firearm a month and live pretty comfortably for quite a while since most of my collection are higher end rifles and all have top quality optics.

2 Likes

@WildRose If someone would have told me 20 years ago that I would be prone to put a $2K optic on a $1K rifle I would have edged away from them and vacated quickly. Now, that is my standard. I am also a huge proponent of FFP optics which jacks up the price even more. Fortunately having worked for U.S. Optics after I retired I still get the good buddy discount deal.

Cheers,

Craig6

2 Likes

@WildRose I agree Charles. Good point about new shooters trying to manipulate manual safeties and also about hunters needing to keep firearms on safe.
I see carry weapons differently from hunting tools. There is no need to be able to present a weapon during a surprise deer attack. I know I’m being a little light humored, and deer have actually attacked though rarely. Of course there are the moose, bears, cougars, etc, so I’d keep a side arm ready just as I would in people public. The rifle or shotgun would stay safed at least while moving and setting up.
New handgunners may fidget a lot trying to find and use the manual safety. The end result is a barrel pointing everywhere except the safe where. Usually the first thing that happens is the gun goes sideways pointing at everyone on that side, and the finger is probably on the bang switch. Then the person may turn around with the weapon extended asking for help. Pinky still on the slinky.
Seriously, I don’t want to be around most new shooters at all. They may not have had the same drilled in first lessons like I did.

1 Like

I am exactly the same Bugleboy. I have a heavy bush holster for when I am hunting, I do carry a heavy bush knife on my left with a sharpening stone ,as well as a skinning knife and sorry when day is over im 4 wheeling out whatever I I shot. New gunners I like enough to go hunting with get the joy of leading the fun and walk point. Now I know most deer aren’t really up on their tactical doctrine. But I don’t want to be the first one they make an example of.

1 Like

And a heavy load in what’s in that heavy bush holster.

1 Like

.45 Long Slide Colt. With the heaviest rounds I can use. As well as alternating FMJ and hollow point.

3 Likes

Two of them do… My Walther CCP M2 & Taurus G2C. I have carried both of these concealed at some point. I had a Springfield XDs and carried it concealed until I traded it. :v:t5:

1 Like

JamesR… I haven’t heard/seen OODA loop since my active duty Marine Corps days. You made me smile! Thank you!

3 Likes

I bought CZ P-01 OMEGA recently. Pistol came with decocker installed, but I switched it to safety right away. Works better for me.
The only disadvantage is that holsters for this gun are not molded good enough in safety/decocker area and safety lever can be moved accidentally. That probably will be a reason to switch back to decocker.

Does anyone have such problem? Hmmm… any CZ lover here? :wink:

1 Like

The short answer is they all do. The one on top of your neck and between your ears

4 Likes

Nothing against striker fire pistols, but I like the short, crisp pull of the single action trigger. With SAO, you better have a manual safety. I had a Ruger P93DC - was the only semi-auto I owned for the longest time. Never really liked that trigger pull (DA/SA), but didn’t know any different until we got my wife her Sig P238 (and subsequently I got my Ruger SR1911). I don’t think I can ever go back to DA/SA, but I am willing to try more striker fire pistols.

1 Like

sig 365 doesn’t, sig 938 does. Carry both, the 365 more often though.

1 Like

Well at 69, and only been shot twice in my life I don’t think I want to take a chance on a third time. My generation grew up with manual safety features on guns. I carried an M16 two tours in Vietnam with a safety, out in the jungles and hills and never had any problems as a platoon leader never had any problems with my guys. Now my wife and I are having our first child and I don’t want any problems. If you don’t like a safety or don’t think they are cool. Don’t worry just don’t use them or click the safety on, holster your gun, when you get it almost inside and set then click off the safety. It’s a gun for goodness sake it’s not some high tech instrument that needs a Masters Degree to operate.

1 Like

The nice thing Robert is that in this country, at least for now we have almost endless options and there’s a handgun out there somewhere to meet everyone’s needs, wants, and desires.

I personally am not a fan of a mechanical safety for a self defense weapon because it’s one more thing we’re likely to forget or screw up under stress so I don’t own them anymore.

Those who prefer a manual/mechanical safety have lots of options available.

I like the fact the XD/XDM both incorporate both the backstrap safety of the 1911 and the trigger safety of the Glock and that’s enough for me.

2 Likes

@WildRose. So true Charles, that’s right lots of options and each year at SHOT Show which is coming up again soon there’s more and better things developed and big reveals (too bad only some industry insiders get to go).
Well anyway have a happy Thursday and happy weekend ol” buddy. Be safe

1 Like

My CZ82 does have a safety, but can only be engaged when cocked and locked. Otherwise it is a da/sa pistol. This does not bother me as my thumb bumps the safety when I am getting it and it is easy to click it off.

As far as the discharge/ND when holstering a Glock I saw a you tube example of the coat toggle getting caught and down through the side of the leg.

1 Like