DC Police Chief Floats an Idea for Reducing Violent Crime

The voice of sanity in a sea of crazy… Never gonna happen but its the thought that counts…

12 Likes

stop releasing criminals back onto the streets and keep them behind bars.

No….no, that won’t work. We need to understand the perp’s feelings, his history, his upbringing, what he had for breakfast this morning, if he felt insulted by someone who cut him off accidentally on the freeway, who he then took several shots at.

In fact, we should so trust the perps that we pat them on the back, give them their gun, a kiss on the forehead, and send them on their way with a couple of extra boxes of ammo.

Then they can feel good.

10 Likes

Only the “bad guys with guns”? Not the machete wielding, bat swinging, knife plunging, acid throwing run of the mill killers? Rapists, child traffickers, drug traffickers… we’re going to need a bigger boat!
I feel safer already!
These are some pretty smart people in DC, it takes 11 times to figure out that a psychopath is sorta dangerous to the general public.
What a F##kin novel idea! He really admitted, that they let psychopaths out on the streets 11 times before he thinks they may kill!
I’m astonished!
Gee, I have a radical idea as well, let’s defund all law and order and allow all the predators to run freely amongst the unarmed!
What could possibly go wrong? We may be the ones who are armed, but we’re the ones going to jail. Because Jack was just a dull boy and of course a “good boy”!
The lunatics really are running the asylum!

image

7 Likes

Aren’t Americans still locked up for that January 6th thing?

10 Likes

Laws do not protect people from violent criminals. Brotherly love keeps people from being violent criminals.

3 Likes

Sarcasm is good, I know where you are coming from brother @Scott361 :+1::+1:

6 Likes

If we would have done that in the first place it may have prevented them from doing the crime in the first place. I hope I am not being redundant.

3 Likes

Yup. This is the only way we pull out of this s**tshow of a nose dive we are in. But nobody on the extreme left or right is interested in this. We can’t legislate people into becoming “good”. Human nature has never worked that way. We always find clever ways around the law to do the things that our violent, tainted human nature leads us to do. We are seeing the result.

6 Likes

I know we can’t stop it but any attempt at stopping it slows it down. That is why I carry a gun.

4 Likes

Sometimes “brotherly love” involves stopping a perp from victimizing an innocent person!

8 Likes

Wait, did Chief Contee clear his statements with the leftist mayor who appointed him?

7 Likes

I have advocated keeping felons in jail for the full term of their sentence since I started working in court. When I worked in court nothing pissed me off more than to see a felon on probation get sentenced to more probation after committing FELONIES while on probation. I finally quit working in court because of that kind of b.s. OTOH, I have come to realize that part of our crime wave is due to the war on drugs. I have a very strong suspicion that many criminals are continued on probation because they are working as undercover informants for the cops. I ragged on a deputy DA about felons apprehended with loaded firearms who were still walking the streets. “Give me some names.” I gave the DDA the names and the number of previous convictions per the news articles. The next time I saw that DDA and asked about what happened I was told the DDA didn’t want to talk about it. That told me everything I needed to know about why they were still walking the streets.

6 Likes

Unfortunately what DA’s want is a high conviction rate. They don’t get any extra recognition if the perp goes to jail or not. SAd.

3 Likes

Sadly, too true.

2 Likes

Actually there is a vested interest whether recognized or not, in keeping criminals moving through the revolving doors. If 90% of the career criminals were serving mandatory life sentences, the criminal side of the court system would dry up. Narc police might actually have to go back on patrol; DDAs might get laid off. Judges might be compelled to hear boring civil cases. Probation departments would suffer severe cutbacks and mobs of ancillary support personnel would be laid off. The most ghastly effect might be that funding might actually be cut.

4 Likes

Make them serve their “full” sentence then reinstate 3 strikes for those fail to understand. And by the way, while serving time they earn their keep. My idea is all facilities have recycling centers, let the prisoners do the dirty work.

4 Likes

Texas has had an interesting system for several decades. Every prison in the system has at least 1 industry, be it growing cotton ginning it making cloth for uniforms, growing beef hogs chickens vegetable gardens for food, to a number of other endeavors. You don’t work you do the entire sentence. You work and do a good job, learn something maybe get out of prison a little early.

3 Likes

Had a tour of the Mississippi State Prison at Angola. MS. The tour followed a talk by the warden. In his talk he stated that Angola not only didn’t cost the state anything, it returned money to the general fund each year. Angola prison is for lifers. While it isn’t 100% true, he said the only way out of Angola was by death or governor’s pardon. Their honor system is strictly enforced. Everyone wants to be a trustee. The Angola Mens Choir which is a trustee position goes out of the prison guarded by a single guard whose job mainly is to handle the administration involved with their performances. They were good. They performed for us. Robert Shaw Chorale, better be very happy they are serving life terms. CA used to have prison industry but similar industries on the outside complained that it was unfair competition. The prisoners made office furniture but only sold to other governments. The office furniture companies complained and lobbied Schitzomento to make it illegal for prison industries to sell stuff that could be acquired from the commercial market. There went all that training in actually having a real life skill. Next they tried using “trustees” to handle airline reservations. The travel agents didn’t have as good a lobbyist in Schitzomento, I guess. The problem with that is the “trusties” weren’t quite so trustworthy. they were taking the personal information and the credit card information and using it to buy stuff for themselves. Whodda thunk? In Mississippi they don’t get that fancy stuff, They grow their own food and I guess sell some of the farm produce. They have row crops, horses, cows, pigs, chickens and I guess they grow their own feed for the large animals. Their yearly rodeo is famous and widely attended and raises money for the prisoner cowboys. Again not a trustee, you’re not a cowboy either.
The warden stresses getting religion upon entry. He doesn’t emphasize any particular religion but he stresses that the prisoner is going to need a higher authority if he wants to get through Angola. I asked the prison official who was our tour guide if he thought that would work in CA system. I suggested that church attendance was probably higher in the South than in CA and perhaps prisoners were more ready to seek religion than would happen in CA. He allowed that might be true but couldn’t make a definitive statement— obviously.

2 Likes