Cars That Repossess THEMSELVES!

from ford???

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The more electronics, connectivity, and general intrusions make their way into modern vehicles, the more I like my simple old truck. It’s just too much these days.

Your car is recording, literally, everything you do with it (right down to if the windows are open or not), and has full access to your phone. It’s an open book, that can be accessed and/ disabled over the air by a manufacturer either by a bad upload or on purpose. I saw an article the other day of a bad over the air update that “bricked” a bunch of cars (can’t remember the brand).

I may, someday, have no choice and need to buy a newer vehicle that is connected, but I’d rather not. I’ll never buy a connected appliance, I don’t want a “smart” home, I use a key to unlock my house, there is no alexa or ring in my home watching and listening, my alarm is hard wired, and I don’t mind getting off my ass to turn on a light or change the thermostat.

No thanks, “smart” world. Leave me the phuck alone.

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I gather vehicle chains will become popular with the financially insecure, or maybe some type of Faraday cage for vehicles. :sunglasses:

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Funny, just after I posted, I walked out of work to go grab some lunch and almost got run over by a repo tow truck zipping through every row in the parking lot. :rofl:

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I purchased a Jeep Cherokee when they first came out. It came with a remote start feature advertised as a convenience for those cold winter days when you want to start your car remotely and let it warm up.

One evening, I was sitting in my living room and I heard my Jeep start up in the garage. Calls to Chrysler just baffled the customer service folks (that is, when I could get through Chrysler’s AI phone system to actually talk with a human being. There’s no AI option for “press 7 if your car has started itself without your intervention” option.)

Seems that this early convenience had been hacked by someone who broke into Chrysler’s customer database and remote start commands. Made the news for a while, but I don’t know whether it’s been resolved. I suspect not.

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I would hazard a guess that it’s been resolved because pretty much everything seems to have remote start, and has for awhile as far as I can tell, but that’s the first I’ve heard of that, myself

I’m also feeling pretty safe in guessing nothing is 100%, not even the mechanical door locks on our homes…so I’m sure there is a possibility

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Now, let’s talk about Electronic Gun Safeties.

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Let’s not. Mechanical combination lock only for me.

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Wait, you said “safeties”, I thought you said “safes”.

Add electronic safeties to my long list of no thanks.

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I have several. Have had them for many years. One I use every day. 100% so far.

Faster to operate than mechanical, significantly more possible combinations, lockout if the wrong input is given too many times.

But I only use them for quick access safes, of which I have multiple in the room/attached room. Even the biometric fingerprint (has push button backup) has been 100%. Unlike with phones or other things, it never gets rained on or something, it’s far far more reliable (100% so far) than my old samsung phone was.

Still see no reason to use anything other than a group II mechanical combination dial on a storage safe, though. Just talking staged guns here

…and they have no connection to anything on the outside. No wifi, bluetooth, etc…not going down that road

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The reason I don’t believe in electronic anything on my safe is because of the possibility of an EMP. They’re not hard to make (instructions on YouTube), and I’m afraid if one ever feel into the wrong hands and was used near my house, I’d lose access to all my guns in the safe. In a situation like that, I think I’m going to need my rifle, if not all the others too….

Edit: Misread the original post about safeties, not safes. Oh well. Same principle applies. If I need my gun, I don’t want to be locked out of it.

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Not Gun Safes, I’m talking abut smart guns

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They all come with backup physical keys.

I myself keep the physical backup keys stored in a couple of safes that have mechanical locks.

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For all the anti-gun rhetoric in it, that article seems (to me) to hit the nail on the head. If you open the door, beware what will come through. Mandates are easy to make when one is power hungry, and it doesn’t take a genius to see that most of D.C. is.

It’s very concerning to hear that about New Jersey, but not surprising.

One major problem I see about the location based smart gun technology is the potential (probability?) for someone to hack it and make all locations off limits to use the gun in. Guns aren’t just for defense of one’s home, they’re also for the defense of one’s community. Prior to October 7, the Israelis didn’t think an attack of that level was possible, but if there’s one thing we learned, it’s that it is. Imagine having a repeat of that nightmare, but this time all the guns were electronically controlled. If a cyber attack were to lock them all out, it would be a complete slaughter. THAT’S the main reason we should all be opposed to the smart gun technology, in my opinion.

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I think that is a very important reason to flatly refuse any smart gun technology. I’m afraid I still see it (hacked by a cyber attack ‘from the outside’) as the second most important reason they should not be a thing, though.

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Exactly my point.

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