Can't stop riding the slide release on my P229 Elite

I have a P229 Elite and a P226 Legion. I love both but noticed I can not stop myself from riding (even ever so slightly) the slide release on the P229 (traditional size controls) causing the slide to not lock back on the last round. Obviously, this isn’t the end of the world but has anyone else had that issue that they were able to overcome? I use the same grip on my 229 as my Glock and M&Ps and don’t have an issue with it until the slide needs to lock back on an empty magazine and getting a click on an empty chamber.
I’ve debated trading the elite for a 229 Legion which has the smaller decocker and slide lever which I like on my 226 Legion.
Looking for tips to adjust the ape behind the trigger instead of changing the gun unnecessarily.

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Maybe try this. :slightly_smiling_face:

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That is an excellent way to rectify the riding the slide problem. :+1: :+1:

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I do the same thing on my VP9 but I really don’t worry about it enough to get rid of the gun or change my grip.

During a private training class the instructor said it wasn’t a big deal, just know it’s not going to lock back on the last round.

If I need more than 15 rounds in a SD situation I’m already in deep trouble because I rarely carry a spare magazine anyway.

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Let me add to what that instructor said. Where I would not obsess over it, I would advise remaining just cognizant enough to work on it and train through it to break that habit. Write it in your journal, if you journal, or if you keep mental notes, keep it, but work on it, until it is no longer an issue for you. Be intentional about it.

For instance: I have a habit of loosening my pinky finger of the strong hand. It definitely messes with my accuracy, and I know it does. So, I have to, in a cognizant way, apply even rear pull pressure with all three fingers and push pressure with the base of my thumb. Or, as it is known: The human grip, coupled with the monkey grip. Point is, I have to train through it because I know I have a tendency to do it.

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CarryTrainer’s method, posted by @BRUCE26 is the way to go. :+1:

Perhaps not so far from the frame, but it works if you move your firing hand’s thumb just a little bit, enough to not touch the handgun’s parts with it.

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I have the same problem with my G17 sometimes

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Two choices-(1) Train until you break the habit. You are talking about changing position by a fraction of an inch. No biggie but YOU have to learn not to do it, or (2) time to trade for something that works for you. There are way too many choices out there to stay a pistol that does not work for you.

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