Ammo in the classroom?

Just in general when we hold classes we do some form of “advertising” whether it is posting times, dates and locations on a web site or by local word of mouth. Most classes need a minimum number to clear the overhead so we have to “advertise”. How many times have instructors gotten a request for information only to never hear back? Yet we just put out the class location, date, rules & requirements into the unknown.

Cheers,

Craig6

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I don’t think we’re advocating a Gun Free Zone so to speak, but that’s a good point. We have armed people right outside of our classroom for a number of reasons (there’s live range, for our safety, etc.)

It’s an educational stepping stone. We’re not saying never, but I am saying for certain classes when the students are new/unsure are good candidates for not allowing live ammo in the room.

People are welcome to have other weapons, so it’s not a weapon free zone.

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Yeah, that’s what I thought but wasnt sure.

I dont “advertise” no ammunition in the classroom.

The students get an automatic email 2 days before class with a reminder and all the rules. One of these rules is “please dont bring guns or ammunition into the classroom”. Then at the start of class, every power point present station begins with “absolutely no ammunition in the classroom”. Except for concealed carry renewals which say “absolutely no gun handling in the classroom. Keep it in the holster.”

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I had just finished clicking off a thread about “Gun Free Zones” when I read this one and it struck me as odd that quite a few (With good reason) were advocating for a totally “Ammo Free Zone”. I get it and understand it but I just thought that it was an interesting dichotomy.

Cheers,

Craig6

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Although I do believe it is a good idea to illustrate the proper function & clearing of a firearm this could be done more safely with the use of snap caps instead of live ammunition.

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Glad to have you here @John250! We use snap caps in class. Which is another reason I don’t have live ammo in the classroom, too great of a chance for error.

The benefit has to outweigh the risk for everything I do when I teach. And the benefit of using live ammo instead of snap caps isn’t great enough.

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That’s an irony that always bothers me a bit… what if I was teaching at a range classroom and some armed hooligans came in to rob the gun shop? The instructors seem to be the very people who should be able to respond, and they can’t, because they are disarmed in the classroom… :face_with_monocle:

I disarm myself so I can teach you to arm yourself…

I know, I know, I get it, and safety happens first, but there is still a part of me that really dislikes being disarmed in a firearms-rich environment.

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IMHO I think the instructor “SHOULD” be armed. The gun on their hip is a tool and a teaching aid. For those who teach concealed carry it is a demonstration or proof of concept. It should never be part of the curriculum other than for a conceal-ability demo. The pistol is not there as a dominance object but more as a deterrent, a defense and dare I say as an object lesson for those that are skittish about handling fire arms. I have received multiple comments about how naturally I carry one was young lady that was very matter of fact “You wear a gun like you wear clothes, it fit’s you, you don’t adjust it, check it, pull it out, fiddle with it it’s just there. No more or less than the pants you are wearing. I want to learn how to do that.” She was a research scientist for a big pharma company (think Bones the woman on the TV show but blond) and she was terrified of guns.

To those of us who do carry regularly and attend a class it is a pacifier in that “OK I trust this guy/girl to teach me and he/she is armed; I am now unarmed, but my teacher is armed, so I am (mostly) OK with being unarmed, now I can concentrate on what they are teaching me.”

While I get the safety aspect and agree, I also get the apprehensions of my students when I teach that level of class. The key is risk management but some folks forget that some risks are external and need to be addressed as seriously as slipping a live round into a class.

JMHO and worth what you paid for it.

Cheers,

Craig6

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@Craig6 that^^^ sounds right to me.

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It’s impossible to have an ND if there is no live ammo.

The more often you handle loaded firearms the higher the odds are you will have one sooner or later.

There’s just nothing we do in the classroom that requires we use live ammo for teaching purposes so there’s no reason to bring that added risk into the classroom environment ESPECIALLY for basic classes.

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I agree that any firearm being handled in a classroom setting should not start with ammunition in it. Any classroom training I have had all required the students to have their firearms unloaded. It makes some sense in that you can’t watch every person in the class 100% of the time. We also can’t know how proficient they are and how well they abide by the basic firearm safety rules.

I also see your point about the instructor or someone else having a loaded firearm(s), but not using those in any way as part of the classroom instruction. Just as an unloaded firearm can’t fire, one that remains in the holster also can’t fire.

Gun shows also require all firearms entering the building not be loaded - for the same reason as firearms in the training classrooms. You do not want people handling loaded firearms with so many people in close proximity, where there is no “safe” direction. At least at gun shows there is a strong police and ATF presence, so the likelihood of someone trying something stupid would be quite remote.

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That depends on where you are… at the in-city shows in MO, there may be 2 officers, one at each exhibit hall entrance. At the smaller shows it’s just us participants.

In Virginia, at all the shows I have attended, there are police at the entrances, and regularly walking the aisles, in addition, there private, armed guards also present and also walking the aisles. There are also ATF agents.

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I’m stunned by this story.

No live/real ammo in classroom for demonstration.

Carry guns: Sure, but the carry gun is for protection, not demonstration.

If an instructor is wearing his/her carry gun, fine. But it is for the purpose of protection and the moment it gets taken out and cleared, it ceases to be for protection. Now there is live ammo in the classroom.

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@Dave17, Virginia and Missouri are different worlds, that’s for sure. Especially now.